Culture and Customs of Jordan

When you come to Jordan, you can't ignore the strong religious atmosphere here. Jordanians believe in Islam, so in the cities and villages of Jordan, towering mosques and minarets can be seen everywhere. In addition, like many Muslim countries, Jordan has its own strict customs and taboos. Knowing the local customs and taboos before traveling to Jordan can avoid unpleasant trips. What are the customs and taboos in Jordan?

 

Even though 80% of Jordan's territory is covered by desert, it is a fertile soil for human civilization. Modern Canaanites, Egyptians, Assyrians, Hebrews, Berbers, Persians, Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Crusaders, Turks, etc. all lived or occupied and ruled in different periods this area. This area is the birthplace of the three major religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the world, and is the center of the most concentrated religious holy places. Scholars of modern history have called this area a "museum of world history".

 

1. Customs in Jordan

The elderly living in towns still maintain the traditional clothing customs, they like to wear Arabian robes, and according to local customs, there are stricter requirements for women's clothing, and women generally do not wear bare-chested and tight-fitting clothing. In addition, neither men nor women wear religious jewelry. Jordanians like to look at each other when they talk, and the two sides are very close. Jordanians believe that looking aside or looking around is an act of contempt. They also hate when people turn their feet towards them, and they forbid delivering things with their left hand.

 

When a Jordanian man proposes to the woman's house, he first says "We want coffee" to the woman's father, and if the other party answers "Let's drink it", he agrees. In some regions, a wife cannot talk to her husband until she gives birth to her first child, during which she can only answer her husband's questions by nodding or shaking her head.

 

2. Etiquette taboos

Business etiquette

The most suitable time to go to Jordan for business activities is from November to April of the following year, especially in September of the Islamic calendar. Don't advertise locally with pigs, pandas and six-pointed stars. Be humble when approaching local businessmen, who don't consider bombastic people to be reliable. Only after a long period of contact and winning the trust of the other party will they not refuse your request.

 

Travel etiquette

The local shops and streets mostly use Arabic, and most people who are engaged in tourism can speak English. When traveling during Ramadan, you should be careful not to eat and drink in front of people during the day, and it is not advisable to smoke. If you invite locals to dinner or tea, you can only invite them after sunset. Take a local taxi and tip another 10%, as well as staying in a hotel.

 

Communication etiquette

Jordanians are polite, walk unhurriedly, never come and go in a hurry. They like to stare at each other when they talk, and the two sides are very close, in their opinion.

 

Dining etiquette

The staple foods of Jordanians are bread cakes and tortillas, and they especially like to eat flatbread with meat. They often eat beef and mutton. Often drink yogurt, tea and so on. When Jordanians entertain guests, they first bring a cup of coffee and some fruit. Rice is usually kneaded into a ball with the right hand and sent into the mouth.

 

 

Main taboos

  • Jordanians do not drink alcohol, so it is taboo to give alcohol as a gift, and they are taboo to talk about topics such as Middle East politics, religion and women's rights. It is forbidden for others to touch the head of the child. When the barber starts to cut the hair, he must first recite two verses. According to traffic rules, honking is not allowed.
  • Jordanians do not drink alcohol, so it is taboo to give alcohol as a gift, and they are taboo to talk about topics such as Middle East politics, religion and women's rights. It is forbidden for others to touch the head of the child. When the barber starts to cut the hair, he must first recite two verses. According to traffic rules, honking is not allowed.
  • Visitors to Jordan can wear light clothes in summer and sweaters in winter. In order to socialize, men had better prepare suits. But in terms of color, Jordan is an Arab country, and some taboos of Islam must be observed in Jordan, so yellow is avoided, and it is believed that yellow symbolizes death.
  • When traveling during Ramadan, you should be careful not to eat and drink in front of people during the day, and it is not advisable to smoke. If you invite locals to dinner or tea, you can only invite them after sunset.
  • In terms of color, Jordanians avoid yellow, believing that yellow symbolizes death. Although the alcohol ban is somewhat relaxed, it is better not to drink in public. Do not take pictures of women, and women should dress solemnly.

 

3. Taboos in life

Jordanians consider it polite for both sides of the conversation to look directly at each other, and it is extremely impolite to stare at the other side. They taboo others to put the soles of their feet against them, thinking it is an insult to people. They are taboo to give wine or pictures of women as gifts. It is considered unlawful and unacceptable by order. They are taboo to pass things or food with their left hand. The left hand is considered a dirty, mean hand and cannot be used for clean things. Therefore, it is extremely impolite to pass things or food with the left hand, and it is not even degrading. They were reluctant to talk about Middle Eastern politics, religion, personal family situations, and foreign aid to Jordan.

 

4. Food culture

Jordan is a forbidden country, so they don't drink alcohol. Jordanians abstain from eating pork, as well as crabs and other monstrous animals. Avoid using pig products and talking about pigs. They don't like to eat red stew and dishes with sauce.

 

Jordanian staple foods are sourdough and tortillas. I like to eat tomato salad, onion mixed with pepper, burnt ham and other Arabic dishes. They especially like to eat kebabs, which are usually skewered with tender lamb pieces and grilled over a charcoal fire. When eating, use a sharp long knife to cut the meat into thin slices, then mix with green onions, fine salt, chili noodles, etc. to eat. The main food of the Jordanian Beibu Indians is camel milk, and they are also happy to use goat milk to make various sweet cheeses; milk, dates, wheat, and rice are their main daily food; some Beibu Indians also use snakes and fly Locusts as food. Some people like Chinese food. They are not used to using knives, forks or chopsticks to eat, but grab food with their hands.

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